Editorial

EDITORIAL: Why is Imee contracting Bongbong Marcos?


This is a question that needs to be asked, now more than ever as it involves China’s growing threats to the Philippines.

But we need to ask: Why is Senator Imee Marcos contradicting the administration of President Bongbong Marcos?

Specifically, why is she taking the cudgels for former president Rodrigo Duterte, whose own former spokesman admitted that there was a supposed “gentleman’s agreement” between the ex-chief executive and Chinese leader Xi Jinping?

The revelation came two years after Duterte stepped down, but if indeed there was such an agreement, then China may rightfully believe that the Philippines was the party that broke its word.

To Chinese and Filipinos alike, word of honor is a very important matter, not one to be taken lightly.

The current Marcos administration earlier said that there was no proof that such an agreement existed, that there were no documents to back up China’s claims.

Lawyer Harry Roque, Duterte’s former mouthpiece, finally admitted that such an agreement did take place, and was in some way binding even if it was sealed with little more than a handshake.

The National Security Council rejected the so-called gentleman’s agreement, and retired Supreme Court associate justice Antonio Carpio added that it was null and void from the beginning.

Yet Senator Marcos at the start of this week said that those who lambasted the agreement were “overacting.”

There was, she said, nothing wrong with any president doing his part to maintain the peace and order situation within the Philippines’ maritime territory through a verbal agreement.

It would appear that Ms. Marcos is using her being the ‘ate’ of the president to give herself the authority to contradict him. She is 68, he is 66.

But to agree with Duterte who had practically surrendered the country’s rights in its own territory is not acceptable.

Perhaps Ms. Marcos is following the Duterte line that opposing China was to risk war, one that the Philippines has no chance of winning.

Therefore, it is better to surrender to a bully than to fight the good fight, even when chances of winning are slim and none?

We think not.

The rest of the world has seen how mighty China has been humiliating the Philippine Coast Guard as well as Filipino civilians again and again through the use of lasers and water cannons, along with ramming the smaller Philippine ships with their bigger vessels.

Quite frankly, every time such incidents occur, we get madder and madder. Yet Roque’s revelation that Duterte had agreed to concessions to China gives us pause to think.

China had always claimed that sending food and water to the stranded derelict warship Sierra Madre at the Ayungin Shoal was acceptable, but not building materials.

A Filipino president had indeed sold the country down the drain by taking the cowardly way out.

But why does Imee Marcos have to air her support for Duterte when the former president is clearly beholden to China for reasons we cannot fathom.

She may be an older sister, but it is her brother who occupies Malacanan Palace. At the very least, she should support his stand that his government cannot be party to any agreement entered into by Rodrigo Duterte that Carpio said “is lopsided in favor of China.”